Journalism and the lingering trauma of dangerous events

Photojournalists Richard Drew of the Associated Press and David Handschuh, formerly of the New York Daily News, spoke at the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Conference on Saturday about the trauma journalists face covering dangerous events. For them, it was 9/11. Here’s an excerpt from their talk:

Richard Drew has been with the AP since 1970 and was part of a team that won the Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the 1992 presidential campaign.

He photographed the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy in 1968 while working for a newspaper in Pasadena, California.

ROBERT KENNEDY
Senator Robert F. Kennedy lies critically wounded in the Ambassador Hotel kitchen where he was shot in the head on June 5, 1968 just after making a victory speech to his supporters. (AP Photo/Pasadena Independent-Star News)

His most recognized image from 9/11 has been dubbed “The Falling Man.” Tom Junod of Esquire wrote about the image and the search to identity its subject.

CRIME TERRORISM WTC WORLD TRADE CENTER BOMBING TWIN TOWERS TERRORIST ATTACK VICTIM JUMPING FROM BUILDING PEOPLE FALLING DOWN JUMPING OUT BODY
In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001 file picture, a person falls head first from the north tower of New York’s World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

David Handschuh worked for the Daily News for more than a quarter-century. On 9/11 he was seriously injured by falling debris, but managed to hang onto his cameras.

See his photographs from 9/11 and read his story from 2014 recalling the day’s events.

terrorist-attack-world-trade-center-wtc-rescue-firefighter-victi

emmy7n-6-web
Daily News photographer David Handschuh’s leg was shattered by falling debris while photographing near the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. (Todd Maisel/Daily News)

 

 

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